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They fought at San Jacinto ~ Part 4

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Posted: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 3:28 pm

In honor of the 176th Anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, this is part two.

Continued: The following men composed the company under Capt. William M. Logan from Liberty County.

The following abridged biographies are compiled from a number of sources, the major one being the biographies written by Louis W. Kemp, between 1930 and 1952, that have been scanned from the original typescripts available in the Herzstein Library, San Jacinto Museum of History.

The author thanks Lisa A. Struthers, Librarian at the Herzstein Library at the San Jacinto Museum of history for additional assistance. The following men were listed as privates.

Michael Chavenoe

Michael Chavenoe came to Texas in 1929 according to his Headright Certificate issued in 1838 for one-third of a league of land by the Liberty County Board.

According to his Service Record No. 1911, he enlisted Nov. 14, 1835, at Liberty in Captain John C. Reed’s Company, that was attached to Captain Mark B. Lewis’ Company.

Chavenoe served until December 13, 1835.

He was a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company at San Jacinto and on Sept. 28, 1853, he received Donation Certificate No. 522 for 640 acres of land for having participated in the battle.

At the same time he was issued Bounty Certificate No. 1375 for 320 acres of land for having served in the army from March 6 to June 6, 1836.

Mr. Chavenoe lost his Headright Certificate, but a duplicate was issued by the government.

After the battle he lived in Liberty County and sold the certificate Feb. 26, 1852 to Charles S. Cleveland for $50.00.

In October 1852, he sold his Donation Certificate October 15, 1853, to Benjamin F. Brown while living in Fort Bend County. He was unable to read or write.


According to John Edward Stark, Chavenoe died between 1853 and 1860 and is buried in the Tilton Family Cemetery, Chambers-Liberty County, Old River-Winfree, Texas.

David Choate, Jr.

David Choate, Jr. was born in Louisiana in 1811 to David and Sarah A. M. Clark Choate.

He came to Texas in 1831, receiving title June 6, 1939 to his one-fourth league of land, Headright Certificate, by the Liberty County Board.

His father David Sr. at Nacogdoches, Oct. 27, 1834 secured a league of land from the colony of Joseph Vehlin.

In applying for it he stated that he had a wife and six children. The land was surveyed in 1835 on Pine Island Bayou in what is now Hardin County.

May 25, 1838, David Choate, Jr., was issued Bounty Certificate No. 3577 for 320 acres of land for serving in the army from March 6 to June 6, 1836.

He was a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company at San Jacinto and on May 28, 1838 was issued Donation Certificate No. 244 for 640 acres of land for having participated in the battle.

In his Service Record No. 7613 it is stated that he drove and butchered beeves on East Bay for the troops stationed on Galveston Island from October 29, 1836 to January 8, 1837, for which he was due pay at the rate of two dollars per day.

It appears that David Choate, Sr., and his wife moved to Harris County and there died in 1845.

At least their estates were probated in Harris County with David Choate Jr., and Thomas J. Choate as administrators.

The Headright, Bounty and Donation lands of Mr. Choate were surveyed in Hardin County on Pine Island Bayou. Adjoining this was surveyed the one-fourth of a league of land granted to Edmund Choate by the Jefferson County Board February 3, 1838. On this land Mr. David Choate, Jr., founded the town of Concord.

There he died Jan. 26, 1879, while a member of the Texas Veterans Association.

On his death bed Mr. Choate sent to Beaumont for his friend John Wood Davis and had him promise to remain with Mrs. Choate and manage her estate. Mrs. Choate died Nov. 13, 1909.

Leaving no children she had provided in her will that at her death all of her property should go to Mr. Davis who died Aug. 10, 1911.

On a plot of ground deeded by Mr. Choate for cemetery purposes are buried Mr. and Mrs. Choate and Mr. Davis in well marked graves. Heavy chains fastened to huge iron posts surround their burial lot. The cemetery in a grove of pine trees is near old town of Voth, Hardin County.

David Cole

David Cole came to Texas in 1830.

He was a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company of Liberty Volunteers at San Jacinto and was one of the captors of Santa Anna.

The Jefferson County Board of Land Commissioners issued his Headright Certificate Jan.20, 1838 for one-third of a league of land.

May 10, 1839 he was issued Donation Certificate No. 870 for 640 acres of land for having participated in the battle of San Jacinto. May 10, 1838 he received Bounty Certificate No. 2284 for 320 acres of land for having served in the army from March 6 to June 6, 1836.

In Jefferson County, March 28, 1839 Cole married Miss Sidney L. Yocum, a daughter of Thomas D. Yocum.

According to the Pension Papers of Texas State Archives, Mr. Cole was granted a pension of $100.00 per year in 1856 and that in1861 he was living in Alleyton, Colorado County, Texas.

In Baker’s Scrap Book, it is stated that he died in 1870.

James Cole

James Cole served at the Battle of San Jacinto as a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company. Unfortunately, his name is printed as James Call on the official San Jacinto roll printed in 1836.

According to the General Land Office’s army rolls, Cole was left at the camp near Harrisburg before the battle due to illness.

He was issued Bounty Certificate No. 4226 for 320 acres of land for having served in the army from March 6 to May 22, 1836, and Bounty Certificate No. 1620 for 320 acres of land for his services from July 4 to Oct. 4, 1836.

Mr. Cole died in Jefferson County prior to November 26, 1855 when his children were given the Headright Certificate for a league and labor of land due him. The children had appealed to the Court of Claims (Court of Claims file 1877).

Cornelius DeVore

Cornelius DeVore was born Sept. 11, 1819 to Jesse DeVore and his first wife. The Jesse DeVore Family came to Texas in 1831.

On June 21, 1835 he received title to a league of land in Vehlein’s Colony situated in what is now Liberty County.

In the Headright Certificate issued in 1838 to Cornelius De Vore for one-third of a league of land by the Board of Land Commissioners for Liberty County it is simply stated that he had arrived in Texas prior to March 2, 1836.

Mr. Cornelius De Vore was issued Bounty Certificate No. 4228 for 320 acres of land, August 24, 1838 for having served in the army from March 6 to June 6, 1836.

He was a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company at San Jacinto and was issued Donation Certificate No. 552 for 640 acres of land, Aug. 29, 1838 for having participated in the battle.

Mr. De Vore was a member of the Texas Veterans Association.

He died in Liberty County, July 29, 1883.

In his will signed August 13, 1881 he left all of his property to his housekeeper, Judy Lacour. The State of Texas had a monument erected at his grave in 1936. He was never married.

William Duffee

On the printed San Jacinto Rolls of 1836, William Duffee was listed as a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company.

No one by the name of Duffee received a headright, bounty or donation certificate so it is uncertain what happened to him after the battle.

There is a William Daffie listed on the General Land Office’s army rolls with a notation that he deserted after the battle, but it is not known if this is the same man.

A William Duffee served as post master in Patroon, Texas in Shelby County in 1868, but it known if this is the San Jacinto Duffee or not.

Lovick P. Dyches

It is thought that Dyches was from Louisiana, settled in what is now Jefferson County and was related to the wife of David Hutcheson McFaddin. He was a member of Captain William Logan’s Company.

David McFaddin married Jerusha Dyches, daughter of Joseph Dyches, at the home of the bride’s parents in Jefferson County, March 19, 1838.

It is unknown if Lovick P. Dyches returned to Jefferson County after the end of the war.

Joseph Ellender

Ellender came to Texas in 1825, settling in Liberty County where he returned after the war. He was issued Bounty Certificate No. 2333 for 320 acres of land for having served in the army from March 6 to June 6, 1836 and was a member of Captain William Logan’s Company at the battle of San Jacinto. The Board of Land Commissioners of Liberty County issued his Headright Certificate Headright Certificate Feb. 1, 1838 for one-third of a league of land.

Living in Liberty County Sep. 9, 1855 Ellender sold his Headright Certificate to William Lewis for one hundred dollars.

Joseph Farwell

Farwell came to Texas in 1835 and was recruited at Liberty for Captain William M. Logan’s Company even though he was a settler of Matagorda County where his Headright Certificate was issued to him April 12, 1838 for one-third of a league of land.

For some reason Farwell did not apply for the land due him for having served in the army.

After the battle Farwell moved to Matagorda County where he sold his certificate July 16, 1839.

Bounty Certificate No. 1053 for 320 acres of land was issued in Mr. Farwell’s name Feb. 10, 1853 for his services in the army from March 6 to June 6, 1836.

The land was surveyed in Runnels County.

Lefroy Guedry

Guedry was born in 1803 and came to Texas in 1834.

Family historian Marty Guidry wrote: “Although today the Guedry/Guidry surname is found widely throughout the State of Texas, the earliest members of this family migrated to Southeast Texas in two movements during the mid-1800s and very early 1900’s. The Guedry/Guidry communities founded by these pioneering families still thrive today. The first Guedry’s to emigrate (Lufroy, Sosthene and Ursin Guedry) left Louisiana in the 1830’s and 1840’s to resettle just across the Texas border.”

June 20, 1835 he received title to a league of land in Zavala Colony, situated in what are now Liberty and Hardin Counties. He did not apply for a headright from the Republic.

He was a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company at San Jacinto and on May 28, 1838 was issued a Donation Certificate for 640 acres of land for having participated in the Battle of San Jacinto.

Guedry received Bounty Certificate No. 9927 for 320 acres of land for serving in the army from March 6 to June 6, 1836. The land was surveyed in Hardin County in 1845.

Some of the descendants of Mr. Guedry were Boyce Spell, Batson Sevan Guedry, Batson Guedry, and Gus Guedry, living in Batson, Batson Prairie, MarySee Prairie and Sour Lake.

Guedry’s donation certificate was located in Coryell County and was not until Dec. 23, 1868, after he had died in Liberty County in 1858.

Pierre Menard Maxwell

Born in Kaskaskia, Illinois, Aug. 25, 1814, a son of Hugh H. and Odille Menard Maxwell, Pierre served Texas well.

His mother was a daughter of Pierre Menard. Michel B. Menard, one of the signers of the Texas Declaration was a nephew of Pierre Menard, and one of the founders of Galveston.

In the Headright Certificate issued to him March 1, 1838 for one-third of a league of land by the Liberty County Board of Land Commissioners, P. Menard Maxwell stated that he came to Texas in 1835.

In the Comptroller’s Military Service Record No. 502 it is certified that he served in the army from March 6 to May 30, 1836.

He was a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company at San Jacinto and on November 17, 1838 he was issued Donation Certificate No. 609 for 640 acres of land for having participated in the battle.

After the battle he served in Captain Franklin Hardin’s Company from July 7 to October 7, 1836, receiving Aug. 15, 1838 Bounty Certificate No. 4205 for 320 acres of land.

He was living in Liberty County October 12, 1839 when he sold the certificate to J. E. Haviland for $150.00.

Mr. Maxwell enlisted from Liberty County in 1842 for the Somervell Expedition and continued on with the Mier Expedition as an orderly sergeant of Company D., J. G. W. Pierson, Captain.

With his comrades he surrendered to the Mexicans at Mier, Mexico, Dec. 26, 1842 and was imprisoned. He was released September 16, 1844 and reached Texas on his return, September 16, 1844.

After returning to Texas, the family recorded that he had died single, a member of the Catholic Church.

David Hutcheson McFaddin

David was the son of William and Sarah Jett McFaddin and was born in Montgomery County, Tennessee in 1816.

Before the Jefferson County Board of Land Commissioners, David H. McFaddin stated that he had arrived in Texas in 1834 for his Headright Certificate. According to other accounts, he had moved to Liberty County, Chambers County after 1858, with his parents in 1828 at the age of 12.

Mr. McFaddin was issued Bounty Certificate No. 1007 for 640 acres of land Jan. 14, 1852 for having served in the army from March 6 to September 2, 1836. He was a member of Captain William M. Logan’s Company at San Jacinto and on January 14, 1839 was issued Donation Certificate No. 748 for 640 acres of land for having participated in the battle.

After the battle, he served in the Army that followed the Mexican armies to the Rio Grande River, and after returning to Goliad, McFaddin helped bury the remains of Colonel James Fannin’s ill-fated volunteers.

In 1842 he was elected Sheriff of Jefferson County. Mr. McFadin married Jerusha Dyches of Pine Island, daughter of Joseph Dyches, at the home of the bride’s parents in Jefferson County, March 19, 1838.

In 1848 they moved to Williamson County, establishing a cattle ranch, and built a mill on the San Gabriel in 1858 with a Mr. Gillette. David H. McFaddin became prosperous in the cattle business and was a slaveholder. He helped in the creation and organization of Williamson County.

The McFaddins lived in a stone residence on the San Gabriel below Circleville, Texas.

Mr. McFaddin died August 7, 1896 and is buried beside his first wife in the family cemetery near their former home, Circleville, Williamson County. He was a member of the Texas Veterans Association.

David H. McFaddin was a cousin of William McFaddin of Jefferson County who served in the Texas Army in 1836.

(to be continued)

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